Agenda

01/12/2022

DEMOCRACY

12 January 2022

6-8 p.m. CET

 

DEMOCRACY

With Stefano Harney and Shalini Randeria

 

Stefano Harney is Professor of Strategic Management at the Lee Kong Chian School of Business at Singapore Management University. An interdisciplinary scholar, his research spans (the intersections of) social sciences, arts and humanities, as well as the fields of business and management. In addition to numerous articles and essays, Harney has authored three monographs: A-Z of Business: a convivial guide (Durham: Duke University Press; to be delivered in December 2019); State Work: Public Administration and Mass Intellectuality (Durham: Duke University Press, 2002), which not only “develops an innovative theory of the labor of government workers in North America” but also offers a “cultural study of the state”; and Nationalism and Identity: Culture and the Imagination in a Caribbean Diaspora (London and Mona, Jamaica: Zed Books and the University of the West Indies Press, 1996), which “examines the changes and influences on the sense of nationalism and peoplehood caused by migration and the ethnicization of migrant communities in the metropoles.” Harney has also cooperated with Fred Moten on a number of publications: Together, they wrote the books All Incomplete (New York and Wivenhor: Minor Compositions/ Autonomedia; in preparation), Black Study (with Robin Kelly et al; Living Commons Press, in preparation) and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (New York and Wivenhoe: Autonomedia/Minor Compositions, 2013).
https://egs.edu/biography/stefano-harney/

Shalini Randeria is Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. She is the Director of the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy and Rector of the Institute of Human Sciences (IWM), Vienna. She is Visiting Professor at the Social Science Research Centre Berlin (WZB). She was Chair of the SH-2 Panel of the ERC grants; a Member of the Senate of the German Research Council (DFG), President of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) and a Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Berlin. She has published widely on the anthropology of globalisation, law, the state and social movements. Her empirical research on India also addresses issues of post-coloniality and multiple modernities. Some of her recent publications include the edited volumes Border Crossings: Grenzverschiebungen und Grenzüberschreitungen in einer globalisierten Welt, Zurich (2016); Anthropology, Now and Next: Diversity, Connections, Confrontations, Reflexivity, (2015); Politics of the Urban Poor (2014); Critical Mobilities ( 2013); Vom Imperialismus zum Empire: Nicht-westliche Perspektiven auf Globalisierung, Frankfurt/M. (2009);Worlds on the Move: Globalisation, Migration and Cultural Security (2004); Jenseits des Eurozentrismus: Postkoloniale Perspektiven in den Geschichts- und Kulturwissenschaften, Frankfurt/M. (2002) and Unraveling Ties: From Social Cohesion to New Practices of Connectedness, Frankfurt/M. (2002).

https://www.graduateinstitute.ch/academic-departments/faculty/shalini-ra...

01/12/2022

DEMOCRACY

HIRSCHMAN FORUM 2022

Convened by Samia Henni, Albert Hirschman Chair 2021/22, the Institute for Advanced Study of Aix Marseille University (IMERA)

 

12 January 2022

6-8 p.m. CET

Register to the webinar HERE

 

DEMOCRACY

Stefano Harney, Professor of Transversal Aesthetics, Academy of Media Arts, Cologne

Shalini Randeria, President/Rector, Central European University, Vienna; Senior Visiting Fellow, Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva

 

 

Stefano Harney is Professor of Transversal Aesthetics at the Academy of Media Arts in Cologne, Germany. He is concerned with forms of art and study that elude established social structures while critically questioning the individual and the institution. An interdisciplinary scholar, his research spans (the intersections of) social sciences, arts and humanities, as well as the fields of business and management. In addition to numerous articles and essays, Harney has authored three monographs: A-Z of Business: a convivial guide (Durham: Duke University Press; to be delivered in December 2019); State Work: Public Administration and Mass Intellectuality (Durham: Duke University Press, 2002), which not only “develops an innovative theory of the labor of government workers in North America” but also offers a “cultural study of the state”; and Nationalism and Identity: Culture and the Imagination in a Caribbean Diaspora (London and Mona, Jamaica: Zed Books and the University of the West Indies Press, 1996), which “examines the changes and influences on the sense of nationalism and peoplehood caused by migration and the ethnicization of migrant communities in the metropoles.” Harney has also cooperated with Fred Moten on a number of publications: Together, they wrote the books All Incomplete (New York and Wivenhor: Minor Compositions/ Autonomedia; in preparation), Black Study (with Robin Kelly et al; Living Commons Press, in preparation) and The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (New York and Wivenhoe: Autonomedia/Minor Compositions, 2013).

https://en.khm.de/lehrende/id.30221.prof-dr-stefano-harney/

 

 

 

Shalini Randeria is Professor of Social Anthropology and Sociology at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. She is the Director of the Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy and Rector of the Institute of Human Sciences (IWM), Vienna. She is Visiting Professor at the Social Science Research Centre Berlin (WZB). She was Chair of the SH-2 Panel of the ERC grants; a Member of the Senate of the German Research Council (DFG), President of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA) and a Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies, Berlin. She has published widely on the anthropology of globalisation, law, the state and social movements. Her empirical research on India also addresses issues of post-coloniality and multiple modernities. Some of her recent publications include the edited volumes Border Crossings: Grenzverschiebungen und Grenzüberschreitungen in einer globalisierten Welt, Zurich (2016); Anthropology, Now and Next: Diversity, Connections, Confrontations, Reflexivity, (2015); Politics of the Urban Poor (2014); Critical Mobilities ( 2013); Vom Imperialismus zum Empire: Nicht-westliche Perspektiven auf Globalisierung, Frankfurt/M. (2009);Worlds on the Move: Globalisation, Migration and Cultural Security (2004); Jenseits des Eurozentrismus: Postkoloniale Perspektiven in den Geschichts- und Kulturwissenschaften, Frankfurt/M. (2002) and Unraveling Ties: From Social Cohesion to New Practices of Connectedness, Frankfurt/M. (2002).

https://www.graduateinstitute.ch/academic-departments/faculty/shalini-randeria

From 02/09/2022 to 02/09/2021

SELF-SUBVERSION

HIRSCHMAN FORUM 2022

Convened by Samia Henni, Albert Hirschman Chair 2021/22, the Institute for Advanced Study of Aix Marseille University (IMERA)

 

9 February 2022

6-8 p.m. CET

Register HERE

 

SELF-SUBVERSION

Jeremy Adelman, Henry Charles Lea Professor of History, Princeton University, Princeton

Ayça Çubukçu, Associate Professor in Human Rights, Co-Director of LSE Human Rights, Department of Sociology, London School of Economics and Political Science, London

 

 

Jeremy Adelman is the Henry Charles Lea Professor of History and Director of the Global History Lab at Princeton University. After graduating from the University of Toronto, he earned a masters’ degree in economic history at the London School of Economics (1985) and completed a doctorate in modern history at Oxford University (1989). His first book, Frontier Development: Land, Labour, and Capital on the Wheatlands of Argentina and Canada (1994), compares the agrarian systems in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in Argentina and Canada. Republic of Capital: Buenos Aires and the Legal Transformation of the Atlantic World (1999), which won the American Historical Association’s Atlantic History Prize. Subsequently, Sovereignty and Revolution in the Iberian Atlantic (2006) tells the story of the downfall of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and the making of nation states in South America.  His most recent book, Worldly Philosopher: The Odyssey of Albert O. Hirschman (2013) is a chronicle of one of the twentieth century’s most original thinkers. Professor Adelman is also the editor of seven books and lead author of Worlds Together, Worlds Apart (6th edition, 2021), a history of the world from the beginning of humankind to the present. He has been the recipient of the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and the ACLS Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship, as well as recognitions for his pioneering teaching at Princeton. Adelman is the Director of the Global History Lab at Princeton University.

https://history.princeton.edu/people/jeremy-adelman

 

 

 

Ayça Çubukçu is Associate Professor in Human Rights and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Before LSE, Dr. Çubukçu was a Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute, and taught for the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University and the Committee on Degrees in Social Studies at Harvard University. In 2020, she was appointed as a Senior Fellow of the Fung Global Fellows program at Princeton University. A transdisciplinary scholar by training, Dr. Çubukçu holds a BA in Government with Distinction in All Subjects from Cornell University and a PhD with Distinction from the Department of Anthropology at Columbia University. Her research and teaching interests are in social, political and legal theory, with a focus on human rights, cosmopolitanism, political violence, internationalism, postcolonial studies, and transnational social movements. Dr Çubukçu leads the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity research group at LSE. She is also an Honorary Member of the Centre on Social Movement Studies at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Florence; Co-editor of LSE International Studies Series at Cambridge University Press; Co-editor of Humanity Journal, and Co-Editor of Jadaliyya’s Turkey Page. A scholar committed to public engagement, Dr. Çubukçu has contributed op-eds to the Guardian and Al Jazeera English, and has appeared on BBC2’s Newsnight, BBC3’s Free Thinking, and BBC Arabic’s television programmes.

https://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/people/ayca-cubukcu

03/09/2022

PASSIONS

HIRSCHMAN FORUM 2022

Convened by Samia Henni, Albert Hirschman Chair 2021/22, the Institute for Advanced Study of Aix Marseille University (IMERA)

 

9 March 2022

6-8 p.m. CET

Register HERE

 

PASSIONS

Bonaventure Soh Bejeng Ndikung, Contemporary Art Curator, Critic, Writer, Biotechnologist, Founder and Artistic Director of SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin

Alya Sebti, Contemporary Art Curator, Director of the ifa-Galerie Berlin - Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen, Berlin

 

 

Bonaventure Soh Bejeng Ndikung is an independent art curator and biotechnologist. He is founder and artistic director of the art space SAVVY Contemporary Berlin and editor-in-chief of the journal SAVVY Journal for critical texts on contemporary African art. He is Curator at Large for Adam Szymczyk’s Documenta 14. His recent curatorial projects include If You Are So Smart, Why Ain't You Rich? On the Economy of Knowledge, Marrakech Biennial Satellite, 2014; Giving Contours to Shadows, Neuer Berliner Kunstverein n.b.k., Gorki Theater, Gemäldegalerie, SAVVY Contemporary as well as satellites in Dakar, Johannesburg, Nairobi, Marrakesh, 2014; Discursive programm – Wir Sind Alle Berliner: 1884-2014, Institute for Cultural Inquiry Berlin, 2015; Satch Hoyt: Riding Celestial Vessels, Galerie Wedding, 2015; Unlearning the Given: Exercises in Demodernity and Decoloniality of Ideas and Knowledge, SAVVY Contemporary, 2016. He is co-curator of the yearlong art project An Age of our Own Making for Images 2016 in Holbæk, Roskilde and Copenhagen. In 2023, he will serve as the Director of Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin.

https://www.archivebooks.org/bonaventure-ndikung/

 

 

 

Alya Sebti is the director of ifa-Galerie in Berlin (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen) and guest curator for the Dakar Biennial 2018. Sebti was part of the four-strong artistic team that curated this year’s edition of Manifesta in Marseille. She was the art director of the 5th edition of the Marrakesh Biennial (2014). Among her recent exhibitions are: Kolmanskop Dream, the solo exhibition by Pascale Marthine Tayou (ifa Galerie, Berlin, 2017); In the Carpet, group exhibition in partnership with Mouna Mekouar and Salma Lahlou (ifa Galerie, Berlin, 2016); Caverne, solo exhibition by Hicham Berrada (Wentrup Gallery, Berlin, 2016); Carrefour / treffpunkt (ifa Galerie, Berlin – Stuttgart, 2015); Casablanca, black energy (Mons, European Capital of Culture, 2015); Now Eat my Script, personal exhibition of Mounira Al Sohl, in collaboration with Thomas Kellein (KW Berlin, 2015); Equilibres / Ausgleich (Felix Kiessling / Hicham Berrada Wentrup Gallery, Berlin, 2014), Des espaces autres (Casablanca, Al Hoceima, Utrecht, Amsterdam, 2013); You never left, Youssef Nabil’s solo exhibition (Casablanca, HD gallery, 2011), Reza Aramesh / Shadi Ghadirian (Rabat, 2010).

https://lecube-art.com/artiste/alya-sebti/?lang=en

04/13/2022

REACTION

HIRSCHMAN FORUM 2022

Convened by Samia Henni, Albert Hirschman Chair 2021/22, the Institute for Advanced Study of Aix Marseille University (IMERA)

 

 

13 April 2022

6-8 p.m. CET

Register HERE

 

REACTION

Ariella Aïsha Azoulay, Professor of Modern Culture and Media, Department of Comparative Literature, Brown University, Providence

Adrian Lahoud, Professor of Architecture and Dean of the School of Architecture, Royal College of Art, London

 

 

Ariella Aïsha Azoulay is a Professor of Modern Culture and Media and the Department of Comparative Literature, Brown University. Her books include Potential History – Unlearning Imperialism (Verso, 2019); Civil Imagination: The Political Ontology of Photography (Verso, 2012); The Civil Contract of Photography (Zone Books, 2008); From Palestine to Israel: A Photographic Record of Destruction and State Formation, 1947-1950, (Pluto Press, 2011); Potential histories, archives and curatorial work: Errata (Tapiès Foundation, 2019, HKW, Berlin, 2020), Enough! The Natural Violence of New World Order, (F/Stop photography festival, Leipzig, 2016), Act of State 1967-2007, (Centre Pompidou, 2016, Arquivo Municipal de Lisboa Fotografico, 2020); Enough! The Natural Violence of the New World Order (F/Stop festival, Leipzig, 2016); Among her films: Un-documented: Unlearning Imperial Plunder (2019), Civil Alliances, Palestine, 47-48 (2012).

https://vivo.brown.edu/display/aazoulay

 

 

 

Adrian Lahoud is an architect, urban designer and researcher as well as Dean of the School of Architecture at the Royal College of Art, London, and co-chair of the Rights of Future Generations Working Group. Previously, he was Studio Master at Projective Cities, Architectural Association, London, and Director of the MA in Research Architecture, Goldsmiths, University of London. He has also worked as a researcher on the Forensic Architecture ERC grant at Goldsmiths as part of their collaboration with Amnesty International on the Gaza Platform. Lahoud was the inaugural curator of the Sharjah Architecture Triennial (2019). His work has also been presented in exhibitions such as Let’s Talk about the Weather: Art and Ecology in a Time of Crisis, Sursock Museum, Beirut (2016); Oslo Architecture Triennale: After Belonging (2016); and Forensis: The Architecture of Public Truth, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin (2014). Often writing on climate change and colonialism, Lahoud is developing work on anthropological understandings of shelter and dwelling. His publications include ‘Fallen Cities’ in The Arab City: Architecture and Representation (Columbia University Press, 2016); ‘Scale as a Problem, Architecture as a Trap’ in Climates: Architecture and the Planetary Imaginary (Avery Review Lars Muller, 2016); ‘A Mandala to a Model’ in Elements for a World: Stone, Water, Wood, Fire, Sky (Sursock Museum, 2016); ‘The Bodele Declaration’ in Grain, Vapour, Ray: Textures of the Anthropocene (MIT Press, 2015); ‘Nomos and Cosmos’ in Supercommunity (e-flux, 2015); ‘Floating Bodies’ in Forensis: The Architecture of Public Truth (Sternberg, 2014); and ‘The Mediterranean: A New Imaginary’ in New Geographies (Harvard University Press, 2013).

https://www.rca.ac.uk/more/staff/dr-adrian-lahoud/

05/11/2022

BOUNDARIES

HIRSCHMAN FORUM 2022

Convened by Samia Henni, Albert Hirschman Chair 2021/22, the Institute for Advanced Study of Aix Marseille University (IMERA)

 

11 May 2022             

6-8 p.m. CET

Register HERE

 

BOUNDARIES

Amal Alhaag, Curator, Senior Research and Public Programmer at the Research Center for Material Culture, Leiden; Curatorial and Research Fellow at Mathaf, Arab Museum of Modern Art, Doha, Qatar

Brahim El Guabli, Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies and Comparative Literature Williams College, Williamstown

 

 

Amal Alhaag is an Amsterdam-based curator, researcher and co-founder of several initiatives, including Metro54, a platform for experimental sonic, dialogic and visual culture and the Side Room: a room for eccentric practices and people together with artist Maria Guggenbichler (2013-2016). Alhaag develops ongoing experimental and collaborative research practice, public programs and projects on global spatial politics, archives, colonialism, counter-culture, oral histories and popular culture. Her projects and collaborations with people, initiatives and institutions invite, stage, question and play with ‘uncomfortable’ issues that riddle, rewrite, remix, share and compose narratives in impermanent settings. Alhaag is currently part of the curatorial team of the quadrennial sonsbeek2020-2024 in Arnhem, Netherlands; senior research & public programmer at the Research Center for Material Culture, Netherlands and curatorial and research fellow at Mathaf, Arab Museum of Modern Art, Doha, Qatar.

https://www.materialculture.nl/en/about/amal-alhaag

 

 

 

Brahim El Guabli is an Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies and Comparative Literature at Williams College. His research covers areas of language politics, human rights, transitional justice, political violence, archive creation, memory studies, Amazigh/Berber literatures, and environmental humanities. His journal articles have appeared in Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial StudiesThe Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary InquiryThe Yearbook of Comparative LiteratureArab Studies Journal, and the Journal of North African Studies, among others. He also authored a number of book chapters on memory, joint authorship practices in Morocco, and the return of Jews in literature and film. He is the co-editor of a two-volume special issue of The Journal of North African Studies Journalentitled “Violence and the politics of aesthetics: A postcolonial maghreb without borders” as well as the forthcoming anthology Lamalif: A Critical Anthology of Societal Debates in Morocco During the “Years of Lead” (Liverpool University Press). El Guabli’s first book manuscript is entitled Other-Archives: Jews, Berbers, and Political Prisoners Rewrite the Post-1956 Moroccan Nation. Drawing on new materials in Arabic, Berber, French, and Moroccan colloquial Arabic (Darija), he makes a novel argument about the connections between cultural production, history writing and citizenship in post-1999 Morocco. El Guabli’s second book project is tentatively entitled Saharan Imaginations, From Mild to Wild: Rethinking a Misunderstood Place. The latter is a study of how a host of authors have imagined, (mis)represented, and engaged with the Sahara since the 18th century.

https://arabic.williams.edu/profile/be2/

06/08/2022

LOYALTY

HIRSCHMAN FORUM 2022

Convened by Samia Henni, Albert Hirschman Chair 2021/22, the Institute for Advanced Study of Aix Marseille University (IMERA)

 

8 June 2022               

6-8 p.m. CET

Register HERE

 

LOYALTY

Fouad Makki, Associate Professor, Director of the Polson Institute for Global Development, Department of Global Development, Cornell University

Sarah Nuttall, Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies and Director of WiSER (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research), University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg

 

 

Fouad Makki is Associate Professor in the Department of Global Development, Director of the Polson Institute for Global Development, Cornell University, and a member of the Cornell’s Institute for Comparative Modernities. He teaches and writes about international development, social theory, political economy, and the historical sociology of modernity. His research seeks to advance knowledge of the sociology and ecology of development. Trained in the comparative study of society and history, he works across the disciplinary boundaries of the social sciences. Set within a broad comparative framework, his writings explore materials from the history and contemporary politics of social change in Ethiopia and Eritrea where he has conducted research for many years. Publications include “Post-Colonial Africa and the World Economy: The Long Waves of Uneven Development,” Journal of World-Systems Research (2015) and “Reframing Development Theory: The Significance of the Idea of Uneven and Combined Development,” Theory and Society (2015). As an undergraduate at Cornell, he was particularly interested in social and political thought and subsequently received a Ph.D. in historical sociology from Binghamton University.

https://cals.cornell.edu/fouad-makki

 

 

 

Sarah Nuttall is Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies and Director of WiSER (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research) in Johannesburg, South Africa. She is the author of Entanglement: Literary and Cultural Reflections on Postapartheid, editor of Beautiful/Ugly: African and Diaspora Aesthetics, and co-editor of many books including Negotiating the Past: The Making of Memory in South Africa; Senses of Culture; Johannesburg: The Elusive Metropolis and Loadshedding: Writing On and Over the Edge of South Africa. Recent essays include ‘Mandela’s Mortality’; ‘Secrecy’s Softwares’; ‘Surface, Depth and the Autobiographical Act’; ‘The Redistributed University’; and ‘The Earth as a Prison?’ She has given more than thirty keynote addresses around the world, and published more than sixty journal articles and book chapters. Her work is widely cited across many disciplines. She has taught at Yale and Duke Universities and in 2016 she was an Oppenheimer Fellow at the DuBois Institute at Harvard University. For seven years she has directed WiSER, the largest and most established Humanities Institute across the Global South.

https://wiser.wits.ac.za/users/sarah-nuttall